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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as I was perusing the web this morning I came across this site and I have to say it is not for the faint of heart. I live in KS where a helmet is not required and all my friends and parents who do not ride get on me pretty hard for not wearing a helmet. I have had several of them purchased for me through the years and have never really worn them except on the highway on long trips. Today may be a diffrent day for me, as I browsed this website. It is pretty surreal and was an eye opener for me. I was and still am a proponent to being able to choose if you want to wear a helmet or not but this just may change your view as I think it has mine.
Take a look
http://www.ride2die.com
 

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For me it is a no brainer....I wear a helmet when riding my Raider, ATV, Dirtbike and even my bicycle.
I work with adults who are mentally disabled.....From traumatic brain injuries after the age of 18. To see how someones life can go from "normal" to being 100% dependant on another person makes you really understand what exactly that big ball of mush inside your skull does for you. IMO ther inconvenience of a helmet is nothing compared to the inconvenience of not being able to wipe my own ass, wipe the drool off of my mouth, cook for myself, walk, etc.

I hear those who dont wear a helmet, to each their own but I definately dont understand it.
 

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Helmets without a doubt save lives, and I wear one 99% of the time (here in NJ it's the law anyway). I high-sided my sportbike back in '05 and I don't even want to consider what might have happened if I wasn't wearing a lid. The busted collar-bone was bad enough.

Something that we must take with us after viewing that site is the following: If you look, many of the accidents were caused by plain, stupid, irresponsible riding of a motorcycle. The couple wearing shorts on the Triumph? Helmets aren't going to help them. The guy that ran into the back of the truck? The helmet didn't save his life either. What would have helped him is not driving 120 mph on the street. The guy that's so eviscerated beyond recognition? Full leathers and a helmet.

Eian (any everyone else) - I absolutely support your right to not wear headgear. We don't need the government babysitting us... BUT

Yes, absolutely wear a helmet. But please, please ride safely, never beyond your skills. Take a rider course, even if you've been in the saddle for decades. You want to drive fast, take it to the strip and have a blast. Don't let those pictures second guess your choice to ride. But if they encourage you to be a better, more conscientious, more PROTECTED biker, then they've served a purpose.

Stupid kills....
 

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Definitely a Helmet also a jacket and riding pants. March of 2007 just received my new Akuma Ghost Rider navy helmet(no wasn't in navy just liked the helmet. was going to but dang those medical conditions) Now, I had done this ride a thousand times without the helmet but I went back to my desk at work to grab it while going to lunch, Just had to show it off. As I was taking a corner about 35 mph the corner had been treated with a deicing agent that can be very slick. As my back tire slide out from under me just prior to reaching dry pavement and as I was climbing onto the side of the bike trying to lay it over, the bike catapulted me straight out in front of the bike landing square on the forhead of my helmet destroying a $360 helmet in under 24 hrs of possesion and my motorcycle jacket. worth the cost of the helmet and the jacket. I think so. please see photo below.

 

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I wear a helmet 100% of the time. I respect everyones right to wear or not wear a helmet. I wear one as a personal choice. There are a lot of stupid people out there. I have two arms, two legs, but only one head. I can function without one of the others, but not without a head. I don't care how safe YOU are, you can never underestimate that idiot in the cage that is busy talking on the cell, or just being stupid. That website is interesting, but I would be willing to guess that most of them people were speeding, or showing off. Except for the ones who were hit by someone else (see above). Ride safe, We don't want to lose you!!
 

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Interesting site, Man, some of those pics are definitely right for scaring someone straight. How much bad luck can one guy have, bike goes down I believe it said failing to negotiate a corner and then gets violated by a old fence post which was laying on the ground. I always wear a helmet, but it's my choice. I also HATE being told what to do. Nuff said. Just ride safe all, I for one know my year and a half old daughter want's daddy around at least till she's a teenager!!lol. Later.
 

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I watched a telephone man fall from a ladder in the town where our business is at. Right next to my plant.
He drove a 2X4 through his body just to the left of his spine and up into his right arm pit.
I held him down as paramedics were 25 minutes away. Prayed for him as he laid there in the hot
sun and tried to get up not knowing he had been impaled.
When I look at some of those photos I think of him.
He lived, no organs were damaged by the accident and he walked out of the hospital. Seems he was accident prone all his life.
He came in my shop one day and thanked me for praying for him while he was laying on the hot concrete.
I was just glad he lived and recovered.

Bottom line is this is more than whether or not to wear a helmet. It has more to do with mental preparedness and knowing your equipment. Practice, practice and more practice and then using all of the fundemental skills you learn in MSF and other studies.

I have come to respect motorcyclists, not bikers, but motorcyclists. Anyone can be a biker.

My Dad rode back in the early 50's and on two lane highways from Champaign, Illinois to Groton, Conneticut where he was stationed in the Navy. Keep in mind he quit riding because he said that back in 1955 there were too many crazy car drivers on the roads!!!

He had a leather helmet (if you call it that) and a kidney belt. A 1950 Harley 74 with springs in the seat for "suspension".

I didn't find it out until I began riding that my Dad was considered to be a very good rider, but an agressive one. He really enjoyed the ride. I think without knowing it at the time I found that I was just like him.

With cell phones, distractions and other things like DEER, animals, and such to deal with we are not riding in the same conditions as my Dad did 50 plus years ago. I consider it much worse. We therefore need to be all the more so on the guard.

I wish we could make all the cars and trucks stay home and let us ride our bikes without the CAGED idiots we share the road with. In fact we don't share the road, we take what we can get of the road and let the selfish distracted idiot cage drivers take the rest. Sorry, just venting there.

See the damage to skin after it drags on the highway pavement? See the dismemberment in the photos?

What I want is the full story behind each picture. To be honest I want to rule in or out was it drugs, alcohol, speed, cell phones or bad roads, animals, or what that led to this occurance.

I am still haunted by the lifeless white sheet thrown over the body of a fellow motorcyclist that I saw in the ditch along route 150 in Ogden, Illinois just two months ago. Now all that remains are two crosses and a lone skid mark that reminds me the motorist who killed those two men had no idea what he was doing when he drove across the other lane.
If those men had been bicycling, walking or standing there they would be still be dead. It wasn't the presence of a motorcycle that killed them. Nor was it the absence of helmets as they both had them on. It was the presence of an idiot behind the wheel of a 3,000 pound bullet, (sledge hammer more like it).

I do believe that speed assists in the death. Speed alone in the right place isn't the culprit but speed in general can led to it. So, let's all slow down.
I do believe that simple injuries can be avoided by wearing gear. The best gear too. So let's all do that.

As I met a man in a wheel chair in the ICU one day last summer I asked him what buzz saw he had tackled. He said, no buzz saw, just pavement. I said, motorcycle, he said yes as he rolled away from me adding nothing to the story.

Those diamond shaped patches all over his face, head, arms and legs were obvious that he was not wearing gear.

Watch riding in packs. I care less and less for that every day.
Usually I ride with one friend and he's a County Deputy and has many years of driving and motorcycling under his belt.
He is very safe in his riding and I know I can trust his decisions, for the most part!
Actually I don't trust anyone when I'm on that bike and have all my soft body parts out there in the wind.

There is only one I trust and His name is Jesus. Not religious, just know Him personally. It was His idea that I receive a motorcycle not mine. I wasn't even seeking to own one.
So at age 45 I take my MSF course, ride a bike the first time since I was a teen when I was sneaking off to ride old junks my friends had for a minute or two without my former Harley riding Dad finding out.
I passed the MSF 100% and went and picked out my first bike ever. Can you believe that?

A gift from my wife of 25 years.

Motorcycling is relaxing to me. I enjoy the ride. But I enjoy doing it right.

I hope all of you will have a wonderful riding season this year. Take it easy on the Raider as it is a very fast, powerful and somewhat hot bike to poke around on.
For those of you who are like me, 45 plus, let's make sure we don't add to those often misleading statistics this season.
More of us "Wild Hogs" are getting bikes and sometimes there the first ones we have ever owned. We learn well and have better sense than we did at 18 perhaps but we still need to recognise we need to learn the basics and not just worry about looking hot on that bike.

Ride YOUR ride not your brothers.

Best to all,

Ken
 

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Amen to that!!!

We must realize that we can only ride as safe as our skills permit.
We can ride as alert as our senses allow and this alertness may be the difference.

It only takes a minimal distraction to steer you into a situtation that could probably be avoided.
It only takes that one last beer to rob you of your reflexes.

Let's be alert and sober when riding and get back home safely.

GC.
 

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It sure is a reality check!!!

Several years after I got my license and some road experience, I was still shaky at doing turns. A buddy of mine who is really into crotch rockets tells me that I should take "Super Bike School...The Art of Turning". After some deep thought, I decided to take it. The course has four levels but all I really needed was level one. That one day class instruction along with track time was a miraculous turning point for me as a rider. My confidence level of how to control and manage a motorcycle was enlightened beyond my wildest dreams. What I learned that day years ago still sticks with me now, more than ever. To this day I can still carve the curves like no business BUT I didn't take this class to be jerk on the streets. I took it for reaction to the action...I did not want to be statistic. I was afraid that I wouldn't know how to react if something sudden happened in front of me. Because of this school, I owe them a gratitude that can not be expressed enough.

Ride Safe...School Yourself and Never Stop Learning
 

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Those classes can be of great benefit to all, but I believe in toning down aggressive cornering on public roads, even if they are low in traffic. It's that pesky gravel that can litter some of them, causing an out of control slide. 20 years ago I took the challenge to be the most in control rider possible. I hung out with a former bike racer, turned mechanic and his cronies. they used to ride in excess of 180 mph on their sport bikes. That day I almost collided into the back of one of them, as they had to stop short after going very fast. They were continually ripping away from myself, and another slower rider. I had a Suzuki gs 700e, my friend hadd a yamaha cruiser. A few miles down the road, the faster group would be sitting on the shoulder, frantically waving us by. A few seconds later, I felt my heart thump, as they screamed by us with a thunder. Then a few miles up the road, they would repeat the drill. I guess they were patient guys for waiting. I remeber going home late in the afternoon, exhausted, and my body continually jumped as I fell into a deep relaxation, I could still hear the screaming engines in my ears. I did become very efficient in taking curves, but one evening I was overly confident, and ended up losing control after passing a car doing 60mph on a very sharp S curve. I could not negotiate the second half of the curve, made a split second decision to lay the bike down.My first thought was something a fellow rider told me "Just when you think you are 100% in control, it will bite you" Time, to me, seemed to slow down, the physical part of me was still moving very fast, but my mind was thinking and assesing even faster, as if my "higher self" took over. I locked up the rear brake, guiding the bike out of the way of the car I just passed. I aimed the bike in between a break in the medians. I saw a lot of oncoming traffic coming in the opposite lane. I was thinking the situation looked bad, I feared being run over. I looked down at the median I was heading for, it looked no higher than a sidewalk. Part of me thought I might just ramp up onto the grass and be on my way. Instead I slammed into it, and catapaulted through the air into a somersault. This is when everything in the physical moved in slow motion. A calmness came over me, I felt at peace and a voice inside let me know that I was going to be alright, not necessarily to remain alive, or to pass on, just a state of "being" alright. I landed on my back, in the soft grass, my Suzuki landed next to me.I heard a man say "Are you alright" as I sat up I looked over and a van was stopped, the guy then said, "You have a band of angels watching over you!" I know Jesus walks with us all, and I know that my "Higher self" was His presence guiding me. I was a bit scared that I may have really hurt myself, but I all I received was a goose egg on my shin bone, where I must have struck the handlebars as I was thrown off the bike. When I looked at my bike, the only damage was minimal. I bent shifter arm, and the clutch and front brake levers were lossened up. I then realized I missed hitting a metal sign, and a concrete slab with a steel manhole cover on it. The median was approximately8 feet wide, the sign was placed roughly in the center of it. I was never more happy to be alive. I then vowed to quit taking unnecessay chances, passing cars very closely, fast cornering and continuosly pushing my machine, and myself. I really enjoyed reading the post by NomadKen, and I agree with him. Riding should be relaxing, and therapeutic. I know there are men and women out there with a daredevil gene, but please, if any of you are reading theses posts, take heed, slow down and drive responsibly on public roads. You know who you are http://youtube.com/watch?v=CH_gdQPya48 Accept Jesus into your hearts and lives. If you feel the need for speed, find a sanctioned race track where you can test your skills. Why take chances being surrounded by other people, who may be having a hectic day, not really paying attention to every detail on the road.
 

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All good posts. I've actually had all other powersports before I bought a bike. Sled, dirt bike, atv. I've always said that bikers are the craziest people out there. That pushing oneself on a sled, atv or whatever is much "safer" than on a motorcycle. Well much older and well...I would like to think much wiser...what an assnine statement that was. I'm actually lucky that I'm still here after riding the above machines irresponsibly(?). I've flipped, turned and hit everthing around me on those. Stupid riding, and speed. Ignorance among riders is terrible, and dangerous. I'm glad that I'm still here and LOVE being on a bike now. I take nothing for granted. I assume that every vehicle and person around me will: pull out in front of me, cut me off, cross in front of me or stop abruptly with no warning. Assume they don't see you and run the scenarios in your mind when your're approaching. It's saved me a couple of times. I've actually found that since being on a bike, I'm a much faster thinker in my truck also. Funny how that works. Later all, and RIDE SAFE. Hopefully I'll see some of you up at the Americade in Lake George.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok,
so that video in Jymmy post is rediculous. Its crap like that that give motorcyclist a bad name. He is lucky he did not kill himself or even worse some innocent person. Absolutley stupid IMO, he deserves to have his bike taken and license if he has one revoked forever.
 

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A lot of good things said here regarding helmets and our responsibility as motorcyclists. As someone who flew over the handlebars of his Raider, helmetless, on April 23, I have promised my family I will always wear a helmet in the future. I am about two weeks away from being able to ride again and I can hardly wait. Last Summer I hit a deer head on. I did not go down but I did kill the deer. I was not wearing a helmet. I fixed the bike and enjoyed the rest of the Summer. I have had two accidents in a short time so you never know. Hopefully I can ride the next 60 years accident free. I am 53 years old. Ride safe. Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mike,
Glad to see you are back!!! Will you be riding a Raider when you are able to ride again? How is the recovery going!!
Good to hear from you again my friend!!
 

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Thanks eian
I will be riding a Raider again. I am feeling good and will post a picture when I am back on the road.
 
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